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January 2, 2013 By

Why Did He Kill All Those Children?

The idea for massacring children in an elementary school or shooting up a mall filled with Christmas shoppers does not come from reading books, watching movies, or listening to music. Does the incitement for such unspeakable acts come from hours of role-playing violent video games?

As we speculate on what was going on in the mind of the murderer, the media are trying to blame his evil act on the lack of gun control. But the ownership of firearms or attending a shooting range do not desensitize someone to the cold-blooded murder of many children.

The act of mass, cold blooded murder requires not only the idea for it, but also a desensitizing to the blood spattered result. Someone who murders dozens of children in an elementary school, as tragically occurred in Newtown, Connecticut, must have grown insensitive to the result or he would not have continued killing amid the horror.

A recent study found that the more someone plays violent video games, the more aggressive he is likely to become in real life. That study, released prior to its upcoming publication in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology in March 2013, seems to report the obvious, but it needs to be said.

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The mass murderer at the Newtown elementary school, Adam Lanza, had an existence that “largely involved playing violent computer video games in a bedroom,” as reported by the Telegraph in England. The British newspaper reported that Lanza had “spent hours playing violent video games such as Call Of Duty in a windowless bunker.”

The liberal media in the United States were slow to publicize his video game preoccupation, but finally Connecticut authorities confirmed that Lanza had been playing “graphically violent” video games. While growing up, one of his favorite games was the violent game called Dynasty Warriors. It is common for law enforcement to fail to disclose to the public the extent to which a mass murderer had been playing violent video games, as well as what psychiatric or illegal drugs he may have been using.

In the case of Adam Lanza, it was a plumber who worked in his house who told what he had witnessed to a British newspaper. The U.S. media have also been ignoring other facts about the 20-year-old Lanza such as his mental diagnosis, medication, and the fact that he didn’t have his father in the home because he had been divested of his father’s authority by a family court.

Few people over age 40 are aware of how extremely violent many of these video games are, and how many hours teenagers spend playing them. Even some bright students drop out of college due to an addiction to video games.

In an outrageous example of judicial supremacy, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in June 2011 that the video game industry has a First Amendment right to sell violent video games even to minors. The case is Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Association, and it imposed a First Amendment prohibition on states from protecting youngsters against violent video games.

If that same case came before the U.S. Supreme Court today, it seems unlikely that there would be 5 votes (or 4 or even 3) for the ridiculous notion that training teenagers how to kill, and desensitizing them to the bloodshed they cause, is a First Amendment “right” that overrules parents’ rights over their own children. State legislators should pass laws to give the Supreme Court the opportunity to correct its mistake, and Congress should consider withdrawing this issue from federal court jurisdiction.

The Newtown elementary school is certainly not the only example of heinous crimes committed by young players of violent video games. A few days earlier in Oregon, video-game player Jacob Tyler Roberts massacred innocent people in a shopping mall in a manner reminiscent of a violent video game, and last summer there was a movie theater massacre killing 12 and injuring 58, by the suspect James Holmes, also a video game player.

In many of these terrible crimes, the perpetrator kills himself too, which makes the subsequent withholding of detailed information about his video game use unjustified. Even when the perpetrator survives, he has surely waived any right to privacy.

A state legislature or Congress should immediately require full disclosure to the public of the violent game playing activity found on the murderers’ computers. Instead of scapegoating gun manufacturers, legislatures should require the violent video game industry to put big, clear warnings on their products as cigarette companies are forced to do.

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Phyllis Schlafly

About Phyllis Schlafly


Phyllis Schlafly is a national leader of the pro-family movement and a nationally syndicated columnist; she is also the author of Feminist Fantasies. Schlafly runs Eagle Forum.

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 (11 comments so far)
social psychology

The outstanding feature of Lewin’s social psychology is group dynamics, the application of concepts dealing with individual and group behaviour. Just as the individual and his our her environment form a psychological field, so the group and its environment form a social field. Social behaviors occur within, and result from, concurrent social entitles such as subgroups, group members, barriers, and channels of communication. Thus group behavior at any given time is a function of the total field situation.

January 2, 2014 at 1:51 am

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Lisa

Yeah, why does no one investigate the drugs? Could it be that everyone is corrupt?

April 1, 2013 at 1:13 am

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Lisa

Why does someone go mad? That's a difficult question. I mean, at one point or another we all want to do some atrocious, but we manage to defeat these urges.

In Israel, for example, people who have chosen <a href = "http://trytolearnmore.com/careers-with-children/">careers with children, have weapons (like school teachers).

April 1, 2013 at 1:12 am

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Merchant Marine

I used to see guys playing those shoot em up video games when I was working at sea on merchant mariner jobs and I always preferred to see them playing racecar games or something like that rather than shoot em up games

March 29, 2013 at 11:09 pm

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Albie Hurst

Awareness of the value of life is dangerously absent in our society. Amidst our searching of what the 'reasons' are for these tragedies to occur, we have avoided the big picture perspective for much too long. This is not religious. It is common sense. As individuals we must get in touch with the value of each breath, the practicality as well as the implication. If we do not reintroduce appreciating what happens in each breath, perhaps through our educational system, then our evolving no tolerance laws which WILL come from larger bandaid applications will have incendiary consequences on the many who can barely manage now the pressure of everyday life; as in hordes of people 'going postal". 'How to' solutions based in what is permissible and what is not, cannot fulfill even the best of intentions or mission statements without 20/20 acceptance of being. The best reason to consider is why are we not called human doings? I suggest the solutions applied to that consideration will lead to fulfillment! Each of us must rediscover what makes life precious, irrespective of circumstance, not just glossed over principles of our largely unknown, under-appreciated greatest asset.

January 4, 2013 at 1:16 pm

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Scott

What bothers me the most is EVERYONE of these killings, think about this, involve a Caucasian. What the hell is happening to our race? This killing spree includes the Oklahoma bomber!! As far a the video game violence, as a child, BEFORE video games and computers even existed, I (we) all played cowboy and Indians, war games; fighting with plastic or metal fake weapons and even (yes I have to admit) BB guns. This is what boys and some girls have done since the begging of the world. it is our instinct to survive. NOT every child, but most of us.
What I see from my son and others his age is the excitement/intriguement of the "visual" blood shed, The AMOUNT of carnage………for the player to be killed, multiple times, yet get back up and kill more. As a former Marine, this is NOT realistic. I DID NOT BUY the games for him, his mother (my ex-wife) did. I never purchased ANY video games for any of my three children (the older grown girls) as I wanted my children to find other avenues to learn and keep themselves occupied, INCLUDING getting outside and playing (physical fitness) or USING THEIR IMAGINATION (away from the computer or cell phones)…………..something this young generation lacks……………oh did I forget they also need to learn to talk and communicate with PEOPLE and NOT games! It would be nice for them to socialize as we did growing up. The video age children and grownups (although SOME are "normal" in the social world and they communicate normal) I see MANY are introverts and lack many human social skills. These are some of the reasons these KILLERS/MURDERS have no regard for human life………even their own. The "normal" world is not reality to them. I know if I did not buy these games for my children they would go to a friends house to play the hours of games (and RARELY talk to their friends……the other players), but I do not like them in mine (huuummm, parents lacking good judgement and control??)..
Welcome to the new generation who will one day be the leaders of this Nation, IF IT REMAINS. Weapons ARE NOT the cause for these killings, it is the society and the person. Let's stop being "politically correct" or pull your head out of the sand folks!
Personally, I "legally carry", two weapons (as a matter of fact), and I WILL NOT run or crawl away from ANYONE who challenges me and others in a massacre. I will die firing back and you will find my (empty) weapons in my cold hands at the end. Truly I feel for those who "chose" not to legally carry a weapon and they had to watch others die and they were shot or killed themselves as they crawled away from the gunman. What a way to die, crawling and/or running away, when they could have CHOSEN to carry and be prepared to fight back! At least the principal and counselor had the heart to try and stop him last month (God rest their souls and may He give their family members and loved one peace). They should have been able to carry and he would have faced true resistance. We MUST fight fire with fire, UNTIL somehow and in sometime, we, as a society, can change the minds of these killers.
To take away ALL weapons is STUPID. Has anyone heard of the
"black market"……….buying/selling any weapon and ammo you want……from the trunk of a car or anywhere? An unarmed society becomes unarmed peasants………which is exactly what a socialist or communist country wants. This is not going to happen in the USA without another civil war……….that is why we have the 2nd Amendment. Our forefathers knew our future………God bless them!
Scott Sgt. USMC 0311 1973-1977

January 4, 2013 at 9:18 am

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Frank Turney

Good artical A mixer of violent video and Psychotropic Drugs drugawareness.org What do school shooters have in common? On some mind altering drug that does more harm than good.

January 3, 2013 at 11:39 pm

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Jim Peel

Years of being taught that it is permissible to kill your unborn children desensitizes kids to killing.

The legitimization of killing at any level legitimizes killing at every level.

To this nutcase, these kids were nothing more than post-partum abortions.

January 3, 2013 at 10:55 pm

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Alan

While I agree with Ms. Schlafly on many points she makes in her articles, this is one time I am totally at odds with her. She points to a bogus study in order to corroborate her own opinion whilst at the same time ignoring countless other stories i've read refuting such a claim. I'm 54 years old and have been playing violent video games much of my life. My children, both now fully grown, have done likewise. Yet here we are today in no worse an emotional state than might be expected of "normal" people. That is to saay we are no more aggressive than the average person. My point is that the real problem resides with the mental state of the person playing the game, the personal ability to seperate fantasy from reality. While an unbalanced individual might be somewhat influenced by said games we must avoid using generalties in defining the outcome of such usage.

January 3, 2013 at 5:07 pm

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Paul Gagnon

You did not get the local news video's of the school as the local police arrived, showing two other gunmen arrested. The local police scanner discribing two men being caught, local residents seeing one man brought down from the woods in hand cuffs and put in the FRONT seat of the police car. A young school child interviewed saying a man was hand cuffed and laying by the gym. Fast & Furious did not go far enough, think about it The actual news video's are on you tube! People were sacrficed at Bengazi, put nothing past this administration. Cll me Gun Control Truther.

January 2, 2013 at 6:25 pm

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Sandra Lee Smith

What makes you think it was "he" as in a single shooter, and not "they" as in a deliberate massacre for a POLITICAL AGENDA? Whether some have failed to see the repeated similarities in the acts and the resultant reports that DON'T match the facts of the acts themselves or not, some can see the pattern and where it FITS into the political agenda driving EVERYTHING both here and abroad!

January 2, 2013 at 3:46 pm

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